WIDOW WAS LEFT WITH NO ROOF OVER HER HEAD

 

 

widowarticle 

Armor Roofing assisted in helping Pam Caulfield get a roof over her head in 2007.

 

As seen here in her master bedroom. When Pam Caulfieid's husband, Randy Caulfield died suddenly of a heart attack in 2006, the room was torn up with no roof and only two walls. Randy and Pam were remodeling it to help care for their 26-year-old son, who had been injured in a car accident and needed a roll-in shower. Her 49 year old husband was a carpenter and after his death, two contractors and friends he worked for pitched in and completed the remodeling for free. To go with the Good Neighbor column. ( Bart Ah You/ The Modesto Bee)

Armor Roofing was brought in and donated time to install a roof for Pam in 2007. 

 

October 23, 2007

By SUE NOWICKI
snowicki@modbee.com 

last updated: November 11, 2007 07:05:48 AM

 

Pam Caulfield's life already was in flux when she walked into her kitchen the morning of June 30, 2006, and found her 49-year-old husband, Randy, dead on the floor from a heart attack.

 

Her husband's death came just a little more than a year after his son, Jason, was in a car crash in Colorado, resulting in traumatic brain injury.

 

"In order to bring him home, we decided to expand our master bedroom and bath so he could have a shower he could roll into," she said. "We began remodeling at the beginning of 2006 and brought my stepson home in April 2006."

 

At the time of Randy's death, he had "taken off the whole roof for that part of the house. All that was there were two walls. The rest was open. We had moved into the other part of the house."

 

His death left her bereft and in shock. "I had no idea what to do," she said.

 

But Randy was a carpenter with friends in the construction business. Two of the general contractors he had worked with, Roger Preston and Michael Nelson, stepped in to finish what Randy had begun.

 

Working on their own time and using donated labor and supplies, it took until August of this year to finish everything.

 

"They would be here until dark at night when they couldn't see," Pam said. "They brought in electricians, plumbers, air and heat, [including Armor Roofing] all people Randy had worked with over the years. These people donated not only their time but all the material it took to do this."

 

That was because of the kind of man Randy had been, they said.

 

"He was my best friend," said Michael, who did all the finish work and built an adjoining porch. "I did it because I loved Randy and I loved Pam. If I died, Randy would be at my house doing the same thing for me. He was an amazing man."

 

He acknowledged that it took extra effort to fit the job of his heart into the job of his ordinary day.

 

"Yeah, it was brutal," he said. "At the same time, you had to know Randy and our friendship. He was the wheel who turned the business. In the real world, I'm (very) busy. But it was a joy. You don't make any money and it takes a long time, but you're just happy you can do it."

 

He said American Lumber deserves a big chunk of the credit for donating "thousands of dollars" in materials for the project.

 

Roger said donating his time and materials was simply a payback for Randy's years of service.

 

"Randy did a lot to help people over the years," he said. "I gave him a reimbursement. There was no way (Pam) could have done it without help.

 

"I think it turned out very nice. You feel good when you do something for somebody else. It was something the Lord wanted me to do."

 

"Roger and Mike are both Christians," Pam said. "I'd heard an expression from the Bible along the way about caring for the widows and the orphans. These guys were doing everything they could to make it a comfort for me. It brought my whole faith forward. It uplifted everything I had known but had never walked through."

 

The process included some painful times.

 

"It was very difficult at first, going out and picking out materials," Pam said. "Randy and I had discussed what we wanted here and what we wanted there, and then I was out there picking it out by myself."

 

But the end result has been beautiful and satisfying, she said.

 

"It's a tribute to the kind of person he was that all these people would do this for him."

 

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